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Untaggable Future Untaggable Cities
Archivio: Fuori Salone 2016

Untaggable Future Untaggable Cities

The second meeting promoted by Audi at the Audi City Lab in the Torre Velasca
Data Pubblicazione: 14 April 2016

Untaggable cities was the theme of the second event in the series of meeting promoted by Audi for the Furisalone in Milan. After talking about people, this time the discussion focused on cities. The starting point was Milan which, as pointed out in his introduction by Fabrizio Longo, Audi Italia brand director, “is again the Milan we wanted”.

Audi committed to organize a competition to gather ideas and proposals to look at the future and innovation of the city, and did so in one of the most iconic architectures of Milan, Torre Velasca, restyled and rejuvenated by architect Piero Lissoni.

The panel discussion, chaired by Massimo Russo, co-editor-in-chief of La Stampa, started from the changes under way in cities, where 7/10 of the world population will live in the future, and that will become extraordinary and increasingly complex places, a development that can be faced only through innovation and technology.

“We need a multi-disciplinary approach”, said architect Michelangelo Giombini from Interni, “and this is the reason why this year’s main theme of the Fuorisalone is Open Borders: crossing the boundaries between cultures, skills and lifestyles.

“Citizens are the energy of cities”, underlined Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator of the Department of Architecture and Design and R&D Director at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Antonelli mentioned the cities of nodes, i.e. complex networks, where even tense confrontations take place (just think of Occupy Wall Street in New York or the protests in Brazil in autumn), which also “become tools for the progress of urban planning and architecture”.

Asked to talk about urban transformation, architects Piero Lissoni and Stefano Boeri described two “untaggable” projects. The redevelopment of Torre Velasca which, Lissoni explained, is a symbol of the city and therefore requires great caution. “But caution should not mean fear, we cannot bring back time. We must have the courage to relate to our age”.

According to Boeri, architecture must be able to make clean breaks. Milan did it in the past with Torre Velasca, and this is the Milan that represents us. The Bosco Verticale (Vertical Forest) project, Boeri continued, was an experiment to continue along this direction and it can lead to new developments on a bigger scale: for example forest cities, a controversial proposal that is already raising interest in countries like China.

In the complexity of contemporary cities, cars can contribute to innovation. Fabrizio Longo, AUDI Italia brand director, mentioned this when talking of technologies such as autonomous and semi-autonomous driving, that can give back time and space to people, without ever forgetting comfort and safety.

This was followed by the experience of a creative, Francesco Ragazzi, art director of Moncler. Ragazzi mentioned the example of Los Angeles as a source of food for thought and innovative energy. “I was photographing skateboarders at Venice Beach, contemporary urban outsiders, and I ended up creating a unisex fashion collection in fall 2015, called Palm Angels. “A new brand that came from one of my passions.”

Text by Laura Ragazzola – Photos by Efrem Raimondi

 

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Design & Made in Italy!
Archivio: Fuori Salone 2016

Design & Made in Italy!

The Italian Design Center, a center focused on Italian excellence, is now born
Data Pubblicazione: 14 April 2016

A lecture hall full of prestigious Chinese and Italian authorities (Francesca Balzani, Deputy Mayor of Milan; Wang Dong, Chinese Consul in Milan), managers (Wang Linpeng, Chairman of Easyhome; Lin Yinghua, General Manager of Easyhome Top Design Centre; Wang Peng, Investment&management Director of Easyhome; Jiang Haofan, General Manager of Happy Mall International Trade co; Amedeo Scarpa, ICE Director and Coordinator in China), architects (Stefano Boeri, Michele Brunello and Yibo Xu from SBA Architetti China) took part in the presentation of the Italian Design Center, a center entirely devoted to Italian excellence that is now being created in Beijing, with a special focus on all Italian design and food.

Created by Easyhome Goho, a leading company in selling all Italian furniture and design set up in Beijing in 2010, and designed by SBA Architetti China based in Shanghai, the Italian Design Center will be a center for medium – high end market consumers that intend to experience the purchase of sophisticated products that represent the best you can find in Italian know-how.

This project has been developed not only for commercial purposes, but also to strengthen the relations between Italy and China.

“Italian design has been in China for a long time now and also Italian companies are present in the Chinese territory. What’s new in Easyhome is that there are two types of relations: on the one hand, this exchange can open up a segment devoted to Italian design&food in the Chinese market thus setting up a creative laboratory, and on the other hand, there is the intention to carefully protect product copyright and authenticity”, explained Architect Stefano Boeri.

Amedeo Scarpa from ICE shares the same approach: “China has been growing in recent years, focusing especially on quality, the protection of intellectual property and the fight against counterfeiting”.

The Italian Design Center will show Chinese consumers the Italian lifestyle, thus becoming a sort of bridge able to connect Italy and China in design and food. This was only possible thanks to Easyhome, platform and ecosystem for the furniture market in China, and to SBA Architetti, that have been able to become a “bridge” between two different cultural and commercial identities.

On the other hand, in the Chinese language the words “hello” and “welcome” as they sound also mean “bridge”.

Text Danilo Signorello – Photos by Efrem Raimondi

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Untaggable Future Untaggable People
Archivio: Fuori Salone 2016

Untaggable Future Untaggable People

Data Pubblicazione: 13 April 2016

Untaggable Future, Audi‘s laboratory of ideas on the occasion of FuoriSalone, opened yesterday in the Torre Velasca, with the first of the four meetings scheduled, called Untaggable People.

This year the main theme “gathers the experiences of some ‘untaggable’ people of our time, who cannot be labeled and come from different walks of life”, said Fabrizio Longo, Audi Italia brand director, in his presentation “since this appears to be a necessary virtue to face the future”.

Gilda Bojardi, Interni editor-in-chief, then announced competition ‘Velasca Progetto Design – Idee sotto la Torre (Velasca Design Project – Ideas under the Tower)’, launched by UnipoSai, with the participation of Milan schools that will design new furniture (the award will be given on 30 June).

Massimo Russo, co-editor-in-chief of La Stampa, subsequently delivered the first presentation, and said that the untaggables who have been invited have shown a special ability to adapt to change, or rather, they are continuously changing.

This value was highlighted also by the first guest, sociologist Francesco Morace, who said that the uniqueness of people and the ability to have relationships with everybody are rewarded in our time, more than the fact of belonging to a group.

He was followed by Guido Guerzoni, professor at Bocconi and a tatoo expert, who defined some qualities of the untaggables, like curiosity and a love for what they are doing, no matter what it is.

This quality was well interpreted by Marcelo Burlon, another guest, beloved by teenagers for his tribal fashion collection; Burlon said that his success story is based on his ability to re-invent himself and to establish relationships.

The meeting came to an end with a panel discussion between Carlo Freccero, member of the Board of RAI, YouTube comedian Daniele Doesn’t Matter and Giovanni Perosino, head of marketing communication at Audi, who said that cars will help us get back some time by taking our place behind the wheel, thus creating the 25th hour of the day, one hour we can use for our passions.

Text Antonella Galli – Photos by Efrem Raimondi

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TGCOM24_ Gilda Bojardi, Interni editor and Michele De Lucchi, architect
Archivio: Fuori Salone 2016

TGCOM24_ Gilda Bojardi, Interni editor and Michele De Lucchi, architect

Data Pubblicazione: 13 April 2016