At Trancoso, in northern Brazil, with an extraordinary view of the Atlantic, a villa experiments with the dissolving of architectural in natural space, becoming greenery in its own right amidst light, shade and the constant voice of the waves

Sometimes limits suggest grand openings. That’s how we feel in front of the vast ocean: the body lingers on the shore, but the mind roams and delves into the natural elements. To transfigure this dual sentiment in architecture seems to be impossible, were we not looking at the eloquent images of the villa at Trancoso designed by Studio mk27 facing the extraordinary setting of the Atlantic Ocean in northern Brazil.

Immersed in the greenery leading to the beautiful beach of Itaporoca, the house presents itself as an authentic experiment with the dissolving of architecture in the natural landscape. The functional program has been simplified as much as possible, and the house stripped of all the spaces that are not strictly necessary (corridors, vestibules, entrances). The closed space is reduced to a minimum, leaving only the basic rooms condensed in five separate volumes, five capsules of life, each essentially devoted to a single function: kitchen, dining, living, master bedroom and two others.

The architecture abandons any reference to the machine à habiter of modernism, and instead embodies a ‘sensorial machine’ where nature, light and shadow, and the constant, infinite voice of the ocean, become fundamental design materials."

The volumes rest on an extended wooden deck with a rectangular plan, slightly raised from the ground, and are placed parallel to each other, though slightly staggered. The deck corresponds perfectly to a reed ceiling attached to 14 portals in lamellar wood. The rigor and logic of the modernist structure meet with some important exceptions, like the 12 rectangular openings that interrupt the continuity of the lathwork to allow trees to pass through, placed inside the deck area, while providing direct light for the public spaces and the private bathrooms of the bedrooms. This contrast between rationality and will further reduces the gap between architecture and nature.

Life unfolds inside the volumes and on this deck, which becomes the connective tissue of the house, freeing up movements between spaces. The presence of the cane ceiling makes the environmental situation very ductile, transforming what would otherwise be a normal portico into a sort of emotional factor that connects architecture and the natural setting. Light filters through the canopy, generating evocative effects of shadow in dialogue with the shade of the foliage of the many trees around the house, scattered throughout the lot as far as the beach. Inside the spaces, one lives immersed in a suspended atmosphere, with the lathwork and leaves breaking up the rays of the sun to form a poetic and constant shower of shadows throughout the day.

The house presents itself as an authentic experiment with the dissolving of architecture in the natural landscape. The functional program has been simplified as much as possible, and the house stripped of all the spaces that are not strictly necessary (corridors, vestibules, entrances)."

The villa is immersed in the greenery, but perhaps it would be more correct to say that the house is the greenery itself. In this sense the swimming pool also becomes part of the dwelling, located at a short distance from the main structure, closer to the beach. The pool has a profile with curved lines that suggest those of nature, while inside it is paced by the parallel lines of two opposing systems of steps that start from two bends and move towards the central part, forming a compartment with an approximately rectangular form. The orientation of the swimming pool is rotated lengthwise by 45 degrees with respect to the main structure, introducing a dynamic dialogue between the pool, the structure itself and the nearby beach.

Near the pool the brush opens to form an evocative clearing. The architecture abandons any reference to the machine à habiter of modernism, and instead embodies a ‘sensorial machine’ where nature, light and shadow, and the constant, infinite voice of the ocean, become fundamental design materials.

 

Project Studio Mk27 - Architecture studio mk27 - Marcio Kogan, Marcio Tanaka and Beatriz Meyer - Interiors studio mk27 - Serge Cajfinger + Diana Radomysler and Pedro Ribeiro - photos Fernando Guerra